/The decision to travel is a personal one: Californians weigh COVID-19 risk amid Thanksgiving – KCRA Sacramento

The decision to travel is a personal one: Californians weigh COVID-19 risk amid Thanksgiving – KCRA Sacramento


The U.S. could see the largest drop in Thanksgiving travel since the 2008 recession, according to projections by AAA. “Nationwide, AAA is forecasting a 10% drop in Thanksgiving travel,” said Sergio Avila. Avila is a spokesperson for AAA Northern California. He said the state is expecting to see a 13% drop in Thanksgiving travel this year compared to last year, with a 7% drop in automobile travel and 48% drop in air travel. Avila added that those estimates could be conservative. “We actually expect there to be likely less travelers than the forecast,” he said. “This was completed in mid-October. So if you think of where we were there and where we are now, a lot has changed, different restrictions have been put in place, not only just in California, but also in other neighboring areas and destinations.”Health leaders and the CDC recommend against nonessential travel as a way to mitigate the spread of the virus. Last week, California issued a health travel advisory that said people traveling to California from out-of-state, including if they are returning home from a trip, should quarantine for 14 days. Health experts are worried that traveling during the holiday could be a “superspreading event” and could lead to a surge in COVID-19 cases.However, AAA adds the decision to travel is “extremely personal.”Avila said they are noticing a wait-and-see approach this year where a lot of people are making their decision to travel last minute and recommend people research the restrictions at their destinations.Carol McCarthy, who lives in Lincoln, was at the Sacramento International Airport on Friday and headed to Palm Springs for a pre-Thanksgiving holiday trip with friends. She plans to return to Northern California the day before Thanksgiving to celebrate with family.“I feel we have to keep going,” she said. “Everything’s going to become a standstill, and we can’t do that. We need our country to keep going.”AAA expects Wednesday, Nov. 25 to see the heaviest traffic increase with around 30% more travelers than normal pandemic movement.Listen to people weigh in on their decisions whether to travel for Thanksgiving in the video above.

The U.S. could see the largest drop in Thanksgiving travel since the 2008 recession, according to projections by AAA.

“Nationwide, AAA is forecasting a 10% drop in Thanksgiving travel,” said Sergio Avila.

Avila is a spokesperson for AAA Northern California. He said the state is expecting to see a 13% drop in Thanksgiving travel this year compared to last year, with a 7% drop in automobile travel and 48% drop in air travel. Avila added that those estimates could be conservative.

“We actually expect there to be likely less travelers than the forecast,” he said. “This was completed in mid-October. So if you think of where we were there and where we are now, a lot has changed, different restrictions have been put in place, not only just in California, but also in other neighboring areas and destinations.”

Health leaders and the CDC recommend against nonessential travel as a way to mitigate the spread of the virus. Last week, California issued a health travel advisory that said people traveling to California from out-of-state, including if they are returning home from a trip, should quarantine for 14 days. Health experts are worried that traveling during the holiday could be a “superspreading event” and could lead to a surge in COVID-19 cases.

However, AAA adds the decision to travel is “extremely personal.”

Avila said they are noticing a wait-and-see approach this year where a lot of people are making their decision to travel last minute and recommend people research the restrictions at their destinations.

Carol McCarthy, who lives in Lincoln, was at the Sacramento International Airport on Friday and headed to Palm Springs for a pre-Thanksgiving holiday trip with friends. She plans to return to Northern California the day before Thanksgiving to celebrate with family.

“I feel we have to keep going,” she said. “Everything’s going to become a standstill, and we can’t do that. We need our country to keep going.”

AAA expects Wednesday, Nov. 25 to see the heaviest traffic increase with around 30% more travelers than normal pandemic movement.

Listen to people weigh in on their decisions whether to travel for Thanksgiving in the video above.

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