/Its Apparently Possible to Drill a Key Ring Hole Into Apples AirTags Without Messing Them Up – Gizmodo

Its Apparently Possible to Drill a Key Ring Hole Into Apples AirTags Without Messing Them Up – Gizmodo


Illustration for article titled It's Apparently Possible to Drill a Key Ring Hole Into Apple's AirTags Without Messing Them Up

Photo: Caitlin McGarry/Gizmodo

One of the first things that jumped out to me when I saw Apple’s long-awaited AirTags was their surface, which reminds me of a giant, polished M&M. Like real M&Ms, AirTags don’t have any holes, which means that you have to buy AirTag accessories to hook the device to your keys or hang it on your purse. However, although Apple did not include a key ring hole in the AirTags, you can apparently make one yourself without messing them up too much.

In their teardown of the AirTag published on Saturday, the folks over at iFixit decided to test whether it was possible to drill a key ring hole into the device, a noble service for those who don’t want to shell out the extra cash for accessories and are willing to take the risk of destroying the thing. If this sounds like you, you’ll need a 1/16” drill bit, according to iFixit.

Before wielding your drill, the first thing you have to do is remove the battery. The key lies in locating and successfully drilling through one of the three notches, which you can see clearly over at iFixit, in the AirTag’s circuit board and antenna shield. The notches are made for the clips that hold the AirTag together. (Remember, although AirTag batteries last more than a year without charging, they can be replaced by pulling off the back of the device).

iFixit notes that the location of the notches “roughly” corresponds to that of the clips for the metal battery cover, which means they can serve as a guide. Now, you want to drill through the notch, not through the clip itself. But should you have bad luck, doing this purportedly won’t kill your AirTag.

In the case that you are successful (and we hope that you are, because who wants to throw money away), iFixit states that the AirTag should work “as if nothing happened.” The device’s speaker, which it uses to emit chimes to help you find it if you lose it or inform others that there’s a lost AirTag nearby, was hardly affected.

There is a price to pay for saving a few bucks, though. iFixit states that if you drill a hole in your AirTag, you shouldn’t expect it to remain waterproof and dust resistant. Meanwhile, MacRumors points out that this will undoubtedly void Apple’s warranty.

In the end, those of you searching for your drill have a decision to make. Is it worth taking a risk when there are accessories available for $12.95 or less? The waterproof thing also worries me, mainly because I’ve had to open my door in the rain. Alas, it is a choice each one of us must make. May luck be on your side.

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