/Meet Kentucky’s final ‘Shot at a Million’ vaccine lottery winners – WLWT Cincinnati

Meet Kentucky’s final ‘Shot at a Million’ vaccine lottery winners – WLWT Cincinnati


Meet Kentucky’s final ‘Shot at a Million’ vaccine lottery winners



All right, good afternoon. We’re going to do this in two parts, just like we did the last time. And in the beginning we’re gonna talk about exactly how serious the situation that we are in truly is the answer is we remain in a critical, even dire situation In how hard we’re getting hit with COVID-19 Yesterday we had over 5400 cases, the second most ever In the course of this pandemic. We set new records yesterday in hospitalizations that have increased every day for the past 43 days. We set a record for Kentucky ins in the ICU, we set a record for Kentucky ins on ventilators and today I can report that now over half of all of our hospitals, 50 of 96 are reporting critical staffing shortages. Let me say that again. Over half of all Kentucky hospitals are reporting critical staffing shortages. We are seeing things like TJ Samson hospital which ran out of ventilators meaning every ventilator they had for normal care, had somebody on it. The state was able to deliver more, but it shows you the level of the serious business. Um, we have taken some steps that we talked about yesterday. The first was a National Guard deployment that begins on the first seven teams that will be helping. I believe in the beginning 3 to 5 hospitals. Uh, we have made our request to fema for a nurse strike team. There’d be 100 individuals. We’ve not heard back on that one yet, but also the ems strike team which we not only got the okay for, but they are now in the state. These teams which remember are I believe fifth of five advanced life support ambulances and 30 personnel are going to be operating out of three cities. That’s Louisville, Preston Zberg. And some are set to begin with now in Preston Zberg and Somerset, they’re going to be helping on regular emergency runs. That’s because um the staffing is short in those areas with Covid. Uh and it’s become a challenge in Louisville. They are primarily um if not solely going to be doing patient transfers. Louisville has some of the higher trauma level hospitals in the state, meaning they can take care of sicker patients. They have pediatric I. C. U. Meaning they can take care of kids that are six. So these are um from fema ambulances that will go out to communities get those sick patients and bring them to the hospital. So that Louisville’s E. M. S can do their regular runs. The goal here is to not interrupt that regular emergency service. Third step we are taking is uh taking over testing in some of the hardest hit hospitals to free up clinicians heard from ST Clair this morning. Uh the the testing we set up is up and running it freed up five clinicians that now can staff more beds. But folks, it is that’s bad. No, it’s worse from a hospitalization standpoint and a hospital capacity standpoint uh than it’s ever been for any reason. Certainly in my lifetime, you are at more risk. Now if you are in a car accident or have a heart attack of not getting all the services you need uh, than ever before. Now, some better news. Uh, as we move into, uh, today’s uh, fun part uh, between yesterday and today, 8250 vaccinations. Uh, what that means is over the course of the shot at a million, we have seen a 50% Increase in vaccinations over those three months, going from about 100, To 156,000. Our vaccine number today. 2,496,578. But if you also take into account the uh, net uh, Kentucky and vaccinated out of state, we are over 2.5 million of our Kentucky residents having taken at least their first shot of hope. It’s everybody out there. Be careful get vaccinated and where a mask when indoors outside of your home. It’s more important now than ever that I mentioned yesterday. I’m changing my schedule as well. Large indoor events at this point have too great of a risk of spreading this virus significantly. And we’d ask people to either refrain from them or at the very least, make sure everyone’s masked the entire time. All right, Good afternoon everyone. We are here to announce the third and final round of winners at our shot at a million sweepstakes, we had our first two drawings in july when I presented Patricia short of the Lexington area and Louisville resident ginger Schultz, The 1st $21 million dollar prize is and the Children and families from Louisville, Elizabethtown, Princeton, Mount sterling, Crestwood, Rohinton, Harrisburg, Harrisburg and Fort Mitchell learned they were receiving free ride scholarships to fund their post secondary educations today. In just a moment, we’re going to hear from our final new scholarship winners and a new millionaire. Before that. Again, it’s important that we talk a little bit about what we have done in this drawing and why we did it in the first place We offered this drawing as a way to encourage people to do that right thing to get the vaccine. The response we’ve had for the sweepstakes has been great. As of yesterday. 419,566 Kentucky ins have received at least their first shot of hope since we announced this incentive In total, 762,174 vaccinated Kentucky ins have signed up for the $1 million 47,544 vaccinated youth have signed up for the full scholarship drawing. But even with the sweepstakes and other incentives, we need more people to get vaccinated and to do it quicker than what we have seen. The delta variant is burning through our population every day. In this commonwealth. Just yesterday. Again, 5,401 new cases. That’s 10,000 new cases over the last two days and it would last three days, 40 600 kids Kids testing positive for COVID-19. So we sit here today, largest number of Kentucky and ever hospitalized ever in the ICU wherever on a ventilator for covid. And our positivity rate is the highest. It has been since we had enough testing to accurately calculate it. So it is dangerous. It is serious and and preventable. And I’ve been traveling around the state to local health departments to hospitals to tell our healthcare heroes how much we love and care about them, how much we need them in every single place. Have asked one simple question. If people out there say they care about you, what’s the one thing they can do? That would mean the most. And to a person they have said get vaccinated, they are safe. One is fully FDA approved and the others will be soon. They are life changing. And this is the only time in the history of the world that we have had a massive pandemic that we can defeat tomorrow tomorrow. So please go to your drug store, go to a grocery store, go anywhere that they have that vaccine and get it. All right Britney. We’re gonna have the fun part now. All right, we brought along um the first lady today who was on a phone call with a lot of the individuals that we’re gonna see. So together Brittany and I are excited to introduce you to our third and final uh $1 million winner and our third round of scholarship winners. So to kick things off, let’s introduce you to today’s scholarship winners. First we have 12 year old Marissa Heron from Mount Washington. Marissa was not able to be here today but she sent a video with her parents. Tessa and Raymond. Where’s the hair? And over here is my mom test. I thank God for this opportunity. I am so grateful for this. Thank thank you. Can we do it one more time? Where’s the hair? And over here is my mom, Tessa, I thank God for this opportunity. I’m so grateful for this. Thank thank you. All right. Uh Next up is 16 year old lily. Nielsen from Nicholas ville lilies here with her parents Andrea uh Nielsen and Peter Milner and her sister bailey. Remember bailey, you are a winner to come on up kids. I’m so thankful to have gotten vaccinated which led me to this amazing opportunity today, we’re very grateful. Uh we chose to all get vaccinated because it was important to our family and for our community. Um education is really important and so get vaccinated. This is a great way for us to combine both being vaccinated and now lily has an opportunity to go to college. Thanks to Kentucky. Thank you all so much and thank you too. Andrea for being one of our public school employees. We appreciate all of your work. Next we have 13 year old Jordan Ballard from Crestwood who is here with her mother lisa sister Savannah also a winner today. Come on up. I got vaccinated so that I could help protect me, my friends and my family. And I just want to say thank you so much to governor bashir and the state of Kentucky for this wonderful opportunity for her to have a free ride scholarship. So thank you very much. Mhm. Next we have 15 year old Grider Birch from Lexington who is here with his dad. Matthew. Congratulations again. Okay. Um I just want to say thank you for providing this opportunity for me to get these scholarships And I want to personally think everyone has actually gone vaccinated. It helps those who are unable to get vaccine and those who are immunocompromised and it just brings us closer to that immunity from covid. Yeah. I also want to reiterate. Just encourage everyone in the state to be vaccinated. It certainly helps individual people our loved ones and those of us that we don’t even know. And thank you very much the leadership of Kentucky for this wonderful opportunity for the scholarships. All right. And finally we have 17 year old Jayden Watley from Louisville who’s here with his parents, Bridget and Damar and his brothers JV in and Jackson. If you would please come on up. Yeah thank you. This is an honor for me to be here to award to be award this scholarship but also got vaccinated to help support the engineering program at ballot high school because I’m here supporting Ballard and one safer place for me and my friends. Yeah, just real quick. I want to tell governor Beshear thanks for the opportunity. Uh truly a blessing. A blessing for me and my family And also as a frontline registered nurse have given the vaccines. I’ve given the monoclonal. I was taking care of the safest to the sickest people people. This is serious. Please get the vaccine. We’re tired but we’re going to keep fighting the good fight. This happened to your part for us. Thank you. Mm. Mhm Jamaar, I didn’t know that you were on that front line. Thank you so much. This is healthcare hero appreciation week. We appreciate you. Thank you and congratulations to all of our scholarship winners. Okay now for the big announcement, the winner of the third and final $1 million shot at a million vaccine Prize sweepstakes is mary Mattingly from Louisville mary her husband charlie and their granddaughter lila are traveling safely through South Dakota. We were able to track them down yesterday after the drawing and after they were able to pull to the side of the road because it would have been dangerous to talk to them while they were still driving. We told them the big news. Hello It’s Andy and Britney and lila bashir, how are you? Uh huh. We hear you’re in South Dakota. We are in South Dakota. We take all good advice and have had a very socially distance and mass trip. But of course most of all we’re vaccinated. So we are hopeful and doing our death. Oh mary, I, I appreciate that. What I really appreciate is you setting an incredible example for everybody around you getting vaccinated and and staying safe. Uh and I’m calling with some really really, really, really, really, really, I’m trying to figure out how many Zeros are really good news Mary, you are our third winner of $1 million. I believe. I believe I am sitting in a car so I’m not in a position to be able to jump. I am so thankful. I am so grateful. I am so honored And I am just yeah, I don’t deserve it any more than anyone else who tries to do the right thing and has gotten vaccinated and has worn a mask in the social distance but I’ll I’ll accept it. I would like to take that more than anything else. I am so grateful for your leadership Governor. Again for your protection. I just want to encourage everyone. Please be vaccinated. I afford the most beautiful grandchildren in the world. And of course they were part of my motivation in getting my vaccination just as soon as I possibly could and I thank you again for your leadership. I’ve had time to calm down now. But at the time of the call. I was excited, very grateful and a little overwhelmed. I still want to scream and run around but I feel like I have to get serious. I have a small tree in my front yard covered with green lights in honor of those who have lost their lives to this unpredictable and frightening virus. I have loved ones who have experienced deaths of family members and my heart aches for everyone who has experienced loss. Finally, I told the governor that I wanted to use this opportunity to encourage each of you to get the shot of hope. The vaccines cannot stop every case but they can greatly reduce your chances of acquiring a serious long term or fatal case of COVID-19 the delta variant is running rampant. Hospital workers are once again overwhelmed. I ask you really, I beg you to put aside your preconceptions and misconceptions. Do the research, consult your trusted medical practitioners and get the vaccine. Then we will get through this. We will get through this together. Thank you Kentucky. Or should I say thanks a million. Yeah. Yeah. Well the thing about a random drawing amongst those that have been vaccinated as you can ensure that they are in the state at the time. They might win but appreciate everybody for our communications team. Uh, tracking them down, they’ve got a future as bounty hunters after I think uh all of this. Um, but really excited to marry as our newest millionaire here in Kentucky. So, again, thank you to everybody who participated in these drawings. Listen, if you got vaccinated your winner, you’re absolutely a winner. You’re a winner. Because you’re better protected your winner. Because your family is better protected your winner because you’re doing your patriotic duty to help us defeat this virus. So, I think we got a couple of our families that are willing to take a few questions. Jaden. Are you gonna lead us off? All right. Especially considering what your father does. I got the vaccine for help Make high school, high school also did it to help support the people who the nurses and medical family. Mhm. School you’re gonna go to yet or anything like that. Currently at the moment, I am still making decisions in which school I want to go to about what you’re experiencing. So, uh, this cash. It was wonderful. I mean, it’s you know, it’s good to hear. I’m happy. Thank God. And bless for it. Uh Even though this scholarship, Yes. Money that’s paid for it. But man thinking I just want some good news. Uh, this past couple of years, you know, have really been rough, you know, for me and my health care friends. You know, a lot of people are getting out. A lot of people are taking leave of absence. Finding other jobs, you know. So, it’s finally good to just hear something new here. Something good, you know? Uh, main thing. Yeah. Okay. And I guess you know why the vaccine and what does it mean help you to get this scholarship and have your education paid for? I guess just getting the vaccine was mainly for the people I cared about and also my own and just the older family members I had because I knew they were at higher risk and that kind of thing. And then I think this scholarship is absolutely amazing. It relieves just sort of that stress of having to think about how I’m going to go to school and that kind of thing. Um, so I got the vaccine because I want to protect myself and just the other people around me. This is the right thing to do. And uh, I think the scholarship will definitely definitely help us like me and my parents not have to worry a lot about debt and money when I just get out of school, which is a very huge help percent and I’ll have my brother and they both take a lot of b both of us need a lot of attention. And so now let’s help relieve a lot of stress with my parents, which is great and I believe a lot of my stress with money and financial aid. Hey jean marc, you join me back up here. So again folks, this is healthcare hero appreciation week and I did not know that you’re on those front lines. So this week we signed um our proclamation making it official and we wanted to make sure we got you an official copy here today. So thank you for all that work. That doesn’t come with an additional scholarship. I know you’ve got three kids but thank you. Thank you. Also want to say that my wife, she’s also healthcare hero. She works in the lab. You know, it’s a group effort uh teamwork Mr. Dream work. Thank you. All right, wait, wait. She’s gotta come up to give me that back now. Okay. This is for both of you. There we go. Thank you so much. Alright great. I’m willing to take a couple questions. Yeah. Yeah. Governor two part question kind of. But first of all you talked about how vaccinations have gone up 50% since this started. Do you think it’s this always to become fear of Covid with delta bearing or a combination? It’s a combination of both. So when we look at where we were in in month periods, these aren’t calendar months but these are um uh four week periods. We hit a high at almost three quarters of a million people getting their first shot of hope. We were able to do that in a month. That’s an incredible uh logistics challenge and and achievement and then we saw it dropping and dropping. I mean almost in half um each month when we announced this that stabilized it um it was moving up some before the delta variant uh took off. But certainly since then we have seen more people get vaccinated. We’ve had some other things happened during that period. To FDA approval is probably a little bit early but people should rightfully be very scared of the delta. Very and I mean uh I’ve been careful about saying phrases like that but this variant is that serious? It is that aggressive? Remember the numbers we put up yesterday though? They’re all about 90% 90% of people in the hospital or that have been hospitalized in the past three months. Um are unvaccinated, 90% of folks in the I. c. U. Unvaccinated deaths or 88 89%. So it is a it is a good reason to get vaccinated. Okay. Is a this is the last statewide incentive. What now the president’s diapers earlier this week talked about local incentives, local programs. That something good thing can be. First local programs have been going on since december 15th when we vaccinated. The very first people the franklin County health departments gave out pizzas that they had right there for people who would get vaccinated. Rm. C. O. S. Have been given people $100 who are willing to get vaccinated. We did Free soccer tickets um to professional soccer for it. Just about every community has done 4567 local incentive programs and I’m for them um any time that that someone wants to to to do them. But on a on a statewide level I think a number of different things are going to be happening now. Uh First the delta variant is so serious. I think you’re gonna see a lot of private sector or or quasi public sector entities requiring vaccinations. I think we’ve seen bellman and Transylvania that are going to require it. We have seen others that are going to require testing from their employees if they won’t get vaccinated. We’re doing 1000 vaccines. I think on Tyson um employees coming up. I think that’s the next major driver and especially as Moderna becomes fully FDA approved. I think we’ll see a lot more of it tom. Uh huh. Yes. Yes. So we got uh and right now at the state fair we have incentives where you get all you can ride passes and you get a gift card that can be used there and if you’re well care one of the M. C. O. S. You can get your money right there. Uh to tourism is given away. Staycations is given away rounds of golf. Um A ton of different incentives that are out there. I know school systems have offered incentives to the kids were we’ve got a free day off. I’m sorry we’ve got a paid uh leave day for any state employee that that gets vaccinated and we’ve been doing things like this uh the entire time. Uh We are we are probably to a point where incentives are good and that they get out the word. And in this contest at the very least created tens of millions of dollars of publicity about the vaccine. That’s the other reason you do. Um One of these and in local incentives get the word out more um which is helpful. Uh I do think that we’re to a point where incentives can probably only do so much to the populations that remain unvaccinated. Yeah. Come here, apologies to take a negative turn here, but I want to circle back to something you said earlier about on hospital ventilator. That situation. Could you expand on that a little bit more and also touch on the state’s capacity cost about is there a certain amount that we have? And at one point we are getting there we have more Kentucky ins on a ventilator fighting covid right now than ever before. And the rate continues to rise um at a concerning level. Uh it doesn’t hit everywhere the same at once because again we have our higher acuity hospitals, Louisville, Lexington and in some other places obviously Ashland, um and a few others that have more ventilators that have big, I see us. Um and and at least in two places have pediatric I. C. U. S. But then you start going out regionally and your hospitals don’t have as many ventilators because they don’t have any, I see us there there in the emergency room in case something really bad happens. But you look at it from McDowell if you remember um they’re more commonly held to people and they had seven die over over over three days. So what we’re seeing is hospitals that aren’t used to taking care of critical patients are having to on a daily basis on an hourly basis. Um And and that creates a real stress on what they physically have. So this was TJ Samson we delivered two additional ventilators. I feel good as long as we get the information on the ventilator side that we can amplify hospitals that are out there. But if we continue at this rate we ought to worry about all of it at all of it. We got some people that are getting treated in their car if they haven’t reached a certain level. We got hospitals that are treating people that are the sickest that have ever been in that hospital ever before. We got folks that aren’t stable enough to transfer. Um We we have challenges transferring patients from hospital to hospital. The fema Strike force is gonna is gonna help that in the E. M. S. But we we all ought to be significantly worried about our our health care capacity. It is overwhelmed in certain regions. Uh And and it certainly is at risk to be fully overwhelmed statewide. Yeah. Yeah. Right. Uh So the on the testing side as things were looking better um the the full government payment of of testing uh went away. The regular insurance and and Medicaid etcetera portfolio of Pes um took over that system. And it has created challenges that we are addressing for instance up until recently and I think we are getting it resolved. Private insurers would only pay for your test if you were symptomatic. Well right, what if you’ve been in contact with someone? What if you’ve been at an event with thousands of people not wearing masks? I mean that’s a time when we want you to get uh tested. So we’ve already fixed this and Medicaid and that’s one population and we put out a bulletin for private insurers that we believe is going to get it addressed. But to other issues in testing, uh Number one, there’s gonna be a bit of a delay on supply chain where we may have uh some shortages of testing material we’ve gone from don’t call it a small amount of people getting tested. But certainly compared to before two. I think right now being about five times the number of people wanting to get tested on a given day that did two months ago. The second piece is where are people going to get tested? And let me say this again, one of the reasons and it’s one of that our hospitals are struggling as people are showing up to the E. R. To get a test. Don’t go to the E. R. To get a test And that’s why we are using uh some cares act money to send uh private testing groups to the hardest hit hospitals um to to free up the clinical staff so that they can go help people who are sick and we can do the testing. It not only I think is working but other hospitals are requesting it. So we’re gonna have to look at all of our funding sources because I believe that this is a constructive step. Um, and and see how much more we can do. Yeah update. Is it going to take large numbers of deaths just for the community to act so to have us. But I could call a special session at any moment. That doesn’t mean something positive would happen. We still have a number of important things in place because the state of emergency is still in place that we need to keep in place. It’s the very minimum of what we need. Uh We need other things to be put in place. That um some of which I think will be easy for the Legislature. We need more. Nt I days for schools we need virtual options to be acceptable. If you’ve got a close school for a week. It shouldn’t be that it’s being tacked on at the end. We ought to be able to go virtual because we did before and schools are getting slammed and its staffing its students. It’s bus drivers and we’ve got to give them the flexibility they need. But then there’s the other steps that if we truly want to stop the surge and save lives, we have to implement. I think the legislature is gonna need to do statewide mask order And that’s gonna be on them. I think they just projected nationwide. We’re gonna lose 100,000 more people, half of which could be saved by universal masking its 50,000 people across the United States. That’s a pretty good reason to do it. Um, but again, I’m not just gonna immediately call them in and we do have some, some time. Um, I want to give them an opportunity to review all the material. Uh, we have had constructive conversations and get to a point where we can achieve something through it and I’m not going to um, wait or leverage to try to get everything. I’ll take whatever, I’ll take whatever tools they will give me and I will fight my hardest. How successful we can be, depends on the level of tools that that we get. Yeah. And Louisville, How many are there? What we’re gonna do specifically? And when will they arrive? So they have arrived today and we are working out all the mechanics in the communication with uh, Louisville’s regular E. M. S and and others. Um, you know, I believe that there are five ambulances that will be there. But let me let me check on that. Those numbers have looked different between yesterday and today. But the goal in Louisville is to do the patient transfer between hospitals. Um, the concern is that if Louisville’s regular emergency, uh, E. M. S. Uh, were to do that, then then there could be shortages to run the regular emergency runs when someone is in bad shape. So this is to free up that capacity, anybody else. All right. Thank you all very much and congratulations again to all the scholarship winners. Mm Yes.

Meet Kentucky’s final ‘Shot at a Million’ vaccine lottery winners

The final “Shot at a Million” winners were announced Friday. Mary Mattingly, of Louisville, has won the final $1 million COVID-19 vaccine lottery.Mary was traveling when she got the call from the governor. She received the call while driving, and pulled over to the side of the road. “At the time of the call I was excited, very grateful and a little overwhelmed. I still want to scream and run around, but I feel like I have to get serious,” Mattingly said. She used her time during the governor’s Friday afternoon news briefing to urge others to get vaccinated. “I felt so privileged to represent all of us that stayed home when needed, wore our masks, socially distanced, got tested and most of all, got the vaccine when it became available,” she said. “I did it for my amazing sons and their fabulous wives, for my four beautiful grandchildren whom I love to the moon and back, for my neighbors and friends, for health care workers and for my husband and me. I want to use this opportunity to encourage each of you to get the shot of hope. The vaccines cannot stop every case, but they can greatly reduce your chances of acquiring a serious, long-term or fatal case of COVID-19.”Additionally, five additional full-ride scholarship winners were announced. Those scholarship winners include:Marissa Herron, of Mount WashingtonLillie Nielson, of NicholasvilleJordan Ballard, of CrestwoodGrider Burch, of LexingtonJaden Wattley, of Louisville. Friday’s announcement was the final of three groupings. Every Kentuckian who had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine could enter: Those over the age of 18 are eligible to win $1 million, and those 12-17 can win a full-ride scholarship.Below is a full list of winners so far in the vaccine incentive program. KENTUCKY’S SECOND SHOT AT A MILLION WINNERSGinger Schultz, of Louisville, was Kentucky’s second Shot at a Million winner. Schultz said she registered just two days before the drawing. “Figured somebody had to win,” she said.When asked about the vaccine, she said, “Why take a chance at getting very sick, and possibly die or even passing it on to someone else? That’s what my main concern was. My mom is 85 and she has breathing issues and I have always been very concerned about her getting it or me passing it to her.”She was joined in July at the Capitol by her husband, Michael Essen, where they received their very large check.Additionally, five full-ride scholarship winners were announced. Those winners are:Shelby Anderson, of LouisvilleIsabella Brozak, of CrestwoodTJ Ponder, of OwentonReese Johnson, of HarrodsburgJulian Sandberg, of Ft. MitchellKENTUCKY’S FIRST SHOT AT A MILLION DRAWINGPatricia Short, of Lexington, was Kentucky’s first $1 million winner.Alongside her husband, Gary, the Shorts were presented an oversized check for the amount of $1 million, a check the couple described as life-changing.“This happens in the movies, and now it happens in Kentucky. I hope it makes one million more people get vaccinated,” Gary Short said on behalf of his wife in the Capitol Rotunda.The Shorts received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as their age group allowed, Patricia Short said, adding that the vaccine incentive program was dreamt up by state officials long after they were fully vaccinated.”We are firm believers that we have to do it. Please get vaccinated. Our kids have got to be vaccinated, too, or it’s not going to work,” she said.The couple said they didn’t really believe their luck at first. Gary Short said he ignored several calls from Gov. Andy Beshear’s office on Thursday afternoon, not knowing the number.“I ignored six calls because I thought it was a scam,” he said.Beshear said he called the couple following the initial drawing on Thursday morning. Both were then invited to Frankfort to meet the governor. Short was publicly revealed as the state’s first $1 million winner Friday afternoon.”It happened. It’s real. I’m still numb,” she said through an enormous smile.The first full-ride scholarship winners were:Jalen Crudup from ElizabethtownCrystal Frost from CrestwoodTyler Henson from Mt. SterlingAdison Sullenger from PrincetonAlex VonderHaar from Louisville

The final “Shot at a Million” winners were announced Friday.

Mary Mattingly, of Louisville, has won the final $1 million COVID-19 vaccine lottery.

Mary was traveling when she got the call from the governor. She received the call while driving, and pulled over to the side of the road.

“At the time of the call I was excited, very grateful and a little overwhelmed. I still want to scream and run around, but I feel like I have to get serious,” Mattingly said.

She used her time during the governor’s Friday afternoon news briefing to urge others to get vaccinated.

“I felt so privileged to represent all of us that stayed home when needed, wore our masks, socially distanced, got tested and most of all, got the vaccine when it became available,” she said. “I did it for my amazing sons and their fabulous wives, for my four beautiful grandchildren whom I love to the moon and back, for my neighbors and friends, for health care workers and for my husband and me. I want to use this opportunity to encourage each of you to get the shot of hope. The vaccines cannot stop every case, but they can greatly reduce your chances of acquiring a serious, long-term or fatal case of COVID-19.”

Additionally, five additional full-ride scholarship winners were announced. Those scholarship winners include:

  • Marissa Herron, of Mount Washington
  • Lillie Nielson, of Nicholasville
  • Jordan Ballard, of Crestwood
  • Grider Burch, of Lexington
  • Jaden Wattley, of Louisville.

Friday’s announcement was the final of three groupings. Every Kentuckian who had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine could enter: Those over the age of 18 are eligible to win $1 million, and those 12-17 can win a full-ride scholarship.

Below is a full list of winners so far in the vaccine incentive program.


KENTUCKY’S SECOND SHOT AT A MILLION WINNERS

Ginger Schultz, of Louisville, was Kentucky’s second Shot at a Million winner.

Schultz said she registered just two days before the drawing. “Figured somebody had to win,” she said.

When asked about the vaccine, she said, “Why take a chance at getting very sick, and possibly die or even passing it on to someone else? That’s what my main concern was. My mom is 85 and she has breathing issues and I have always been very concerned about her getting it or me passing it to her.”

She was joined in July at the Capitol by her husband, Michael Essen, where they received their very large check.

Additionally, five full-ride scholarship winners were announced. Those winners are:


KENTUCKY’S FIRST SHOT AT A MILLION DRAWING

Patricia Short, of Lexington, was Kentucky’s first $1 million winner.

Alongside her husband, Gary, the Shorts were presented an oversized check for the amount of $1 million, a check the couple described as life-changing.

“This happens in the movies, and now it happens in Kentucky. I hope it makes one million more people get vaccinated,” Gary Short said on behalf of his wife in the Capitol Rotunda.

The Shorts received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as their age group allowed, Patricia Short said, adding that the vaccine incentive program was dreamt up by state officials long after they were fully vaccinated.

“We are firm believers that we have to do it. Please get vaccinated. Our kids have got to be vaccinated, too, or it’s not going to work,” she said.

The couple said they didn’t really believe their luck at first. Gary Short said he ignored several calls from Gov. Andy Beshear’s office on Thursday afternoon, not knowing the number.

“I ignored six calls because I thought it was a scam,” he said.

Beshear said he called the couple following the initial drawing on Thursday morning. Both were then invited to Frankfort to meet the governor. Short was publicly revealed as the state’s first $1 million winner Friday afternoon.

“It happened. It’s real. I’m still numb,” she said through an enormous smile.

The first full-ride scholarship winners were:

  • Jalen Crudup from Elizabethtown
  • Crystal Frost from Crestwood
  • Tyler Henson from Mt. Sterling
  • Adison Sullenger from Princeton
  • Alex VonderHaar from Louisville
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