/COVID-19 in California: Track COVID cases, vaccine rates, omicron variant updates, booster shot and testing info – KCRA Sacramento

COVID-19 in California: Track COVID cases, vaccine rates, omicron variant updates, booster shot and testing info – KCRA Sacramento


THAT COMING UP. :TY THANK YOU, TAMA.RA THAT’S A LOOK AT WHAT WE’RE FOLLOWING HERE ON KCRA 3 TODAY. BRANDI: TURNING TO ROU CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE. THIS MNIORNG, MORE THAN A DOZEN STATES ARE REPORTING CONFIRMED CASES OF THE NEW COVID-19 VARIANT, OMICRON. WHILE THERE’S STILL A LOT TO LEARN, WE ARE GETTING A CLEARER PICTURE OF HOW THIS NEW VARIANT COULD PLAY OUT. TY: KCRA 3’S AIXA DIAZ JOINUSS LIVE FROM OUR WASHINGTON NEWSROOM. AIXA, WHAT ARE SCIENTISTS SAYING? AIXA: RIGHT NOW IT APPEARS OMICRON IS MORE CONTAGIOUS BUT LESS SEVERE THAN DELTA WHICH REMAINS THE DOMINANT VARIANT HERE IN THE U.S. U.S. HEALTH OFFICIALS ARE CAIOUTUSLY OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THE NEW COVID-19 VARIANT. EARLY STUDIES SUGGEST OMICRON IS A LESS SEVERE VARIANT COMPARED TO DELTA. >> THUS FAR, THE SIGNALS ARE BIT ENCOURAGING REGAINRDG THE SEVERITY. AIXA: DOCTORS SAY IT’S STILL OTO SOON TO OWKN WHAT THE COMING WEEKS WILL REVEAL ABOUT OMICRON, WHICH IS SPREADI QUINGCKLY IN SOUTH AFRICA BUT NOT CAUSING AN ALARMING RISE IN HOSPITALIZATIO.NS >> RIGHT NOW, ALL THE EVIDENCE IS THAT A LOT OF THE PEOPLE WHO ARE PRESENTING WITH INFECTION FROM THIS NEW VARIANT ARE PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN PREVIOLYUS INFECTED WITH DELTA. REMEMBERSO, UTH AFRICA HAD A VERY DEVASTATING DELTA WAVE. THEY HAVE SOME PROTECTION FROM COVID. THEY ‘HEY ’RE GETTING INFECTED BUT THEY’RE NOT GETTING AS SICK. AI:XA HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY FOR NOW VACCINATIONS AND BOOSTSER ARE THE BEST DEFENSE AGAINST OMICRON AND DELTA. >> THE NEXT SIX MONTHS REALLY DEPEND ON HOW WE MOBILIZE TOGETHER TO DO THE THINGS THAT WE KNOW WORK. AI:XA THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION COULD BE LIFTING TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS FROM CERTAIN AFRICAN NATIONS. THOSE TRAVEL BANS ANNOUNCED AF TER OMICRON WAS FIRST DETECTED IN SOUTH AFRICA HAVE BEEN CRITICIZED BY SOME WORLD LEADERS. IN WASHINGTON, I’M AIXA DZ.IA TY: THANKS, AIXA. BRANDI: WITH NEW TRAVEL GUIDELINES NOW IN EFFECT, SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IS INCREASING ITS SAFETY PRECAUTIS.ON THE AIRPORT IS ONE OF FOUR INVOLVED IN A VOLUNTARY TESTING PILOT PROGM.RA ABOUT 500 TO 800 PEOPLE AR TESTED EVERY DAY AFTER ARRIVING AT THE AIRPORT. RIGHT NOW, SFO IS ADLEING THE NA TION WITH THE AMOUNT OF TESTING AND PEOPLE WILLING TO TEST WHETHN EY ARRE.IV A SPOKESPERSON FOR THE AIRPORT SAYS HE DOESN’T EXPECT THE NEW RESTRICTIONS TO IMPACT TIRHE DAY-TO-DAY OPERATIONS. >> WHAT IT MAY DO IS PUT TESNGTI STRAIN ON THESE FOREIGN AIRPORTS. THIS NEEDS TO BE SATISFIED BEFORE YOU CANOA BRD A FLIGHT INTO THE UNITED STATES. IT IS IN THE HANDS OF THE AIRLINES OPERATING FLIGHTS IONT THE U.S. TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE NOT BOARDING ANYBODY THAT DOESN’T MEET THE NEW REQUIREMENT. BRANDI: TESTING, HE SS,AY WILL BE IMPORTANT TO ENDING THE PANDEMIC. TY: 275. MILLION ARE FULLY VACCINATED, 3.1 MILLION ARE WAITING FOR E THSENDCO DOSE, 6.5 HAVE GOTTEN THE BOOST.ER UYO CAN TRACK COVID CASES AND HOSPITALIZATIONS THROUGHOUT THE STATE. VACCINATNIO RATES, BOOSTER SHOTS, AND THE LATEST ON THE OMICRON VARIANT

COVID-19 in California: Track COVID cases, vaccine rates, omicron variant updates, booster shot and testing info

Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in California, community transmission, vaccine rates and booster shots and the latest headlines — all in one place.App users, click here to see all the charts with this story. Latest COVID-19 cases in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state)Community transmission in California Below you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California. Latest COVID-19 headlines European travel powerhouse and 6 other places at ‘very high’ risk for COVID-19, CDC says | France and four of its European neighbors moved to Level 4, the CDC’s highest-risk category, on Monday. France was the world’s top destination for international tourist arrivals pre-pandemic, according to 2019 figures from the United Nations World Tourism Organization. Cruise ship with COVID-19 infections arrives in New Orleans | A Norwegian Cruise Lines ship that docked in New Orleans this weekend has confirmed at least 17 COVID-19 cases among crew members and passengers. NYC to impose COVID-19 vaccine mandate on private sector employers | The vaccine mandate for private businesses will take effect Dec. 27 and is aimed at preventing a spike in COVID-19 infections during the holiday season and the colder months, the Democratic mayor said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” Omicron vs. delta: Battle of COVID-19 mutations is critical | As the omicron coronavirus variant spreads in southern Africa and pops up in countries all around the world, scientists are anxiously watching a battle play out that could determine the future of the pandemic. Can the latest competitor to the world-dominating delta overthrow it? The world has the tools to end the coronavirus pandemic. They’re not being used properly | The COVID-19 pandemic will not last forever. It will likely continue to fizzle and fade as it heads towards its third year, resurging with new variants and then waning in the face of vaccines, mitigation measures and human behavior. But even if the virus is never stamped out, immunity will improve and the world will eventually be able to live with COVID. ‘Bridge to nowhere’: People placed on ventilators have high chance of mortality | There’s at least 51 COVID-19 patients on ventilators at metro hospitals, a Nebraska Medicine doctor said once that happens, it’s a bridge leading to nowhere. ‘The worst day of my life’: Mom of 4 dies from COVID-19 days after giving birth | Adrienne Chandler was a mom of four. She died from COVID-19 three days after having her fourth child. Family tells sister station WISN she never got to meet the newborn. Dr. Fauci says early reports encouraging about omicron variant, but still urges caution | U.S. health officials said Sunday that while the omicron variant of the coronavirus is rapidly spreading throughout the country, early indications suggest it may be less dangerous than delta, which continues to drive a surge of hospitalizations. Northern California parents knowingly sent child to school with COVID | Northern California parents knowingly sent their COVID-19 positive child and a sibling to school last month in violation of isolation and quarantine rules, causing a coronavirus outbreak in an elementary school, officials said Saturday. Study: Mix-and-match J&J COVID-19 booster raised immune response after Pfizer vaccine | Using the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as a booster for people initially immunized with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine produces a strong immune response and may do more to elicit protection against severe disease, researchers reported Sunday. How many vaccines have been administered in California?| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP 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 Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country?Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.Pharmacy vaccine information:CVSRite AidWalgreens Can my child be vaccinated against COVID-19?In November, the CDC gave the final OK to approve Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11.The kid-sized dose is one-third the size of the adult dose and is administered with a smaller needle. Similar to the adult dosage, eligible kids will need to have two shots that are 21 days apart. Parents can book appointments for their child on MyTurn.ca.gov or call 833-422-4255.| MORE | Click here for more information on pharmacies providing the COVID-19 vaccine for your childYou can also check your county’s health department for more information on upcoming vaccine clinics.Sacramento CountyStanislaus CountySan Joaquin CountyYolo CountyPlacer CountyEl Dorado CountySolano County Will I need a booster shot?The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Nov. 30 strengthened its recommendations for who should get a COVID-19 booster shot. All adults should get a booster due to waning immunity, the CDC says. People immunized with Pfizer/BioNTech’s or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines should get a booster six months after they finish their first two doses. Anyone who got a Johnson & Johnson shot at least two months ago should also get a booster, the CDC said. California officials previously made similar recommendations. “The recent emergence of the Omicron variant (B.1.1.529) further emphasizes the importance of vaccination, boosters, and prevention efforts needed to protect against COVID-19,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said.See the CDC’s information on boosters here.What should I know about the vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from the FDA?Moderna and Pfizer vaccinesHailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.Those COVID-19 vaccines currently approved under emergency use authorization contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”Johnson & Johnson’s vaccineOn Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. and is one that “checks nearly all the boxes.”The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, was said to be safe and effective, and it’s considered flexible. It’s a single dose, and it doesn’t require special storage.The vaccine is authorized for people ages 18 and older.The CDC and the FDA on April 13 said they were investigating several cases of unusual clots that occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination. The clots occurred in veins that drain blood from the brain and occurred together with low platelets. As a result, the agencies recommended a “pause” in vaccinations with J&J’s vaccine so investigators could look into the cases. Health officials said in an update on April 23 they were aware of 15 cases of the unusual clots since the government authorized use of the vaccine and nearly 8 million shots were given. All were women, most of them under 50. Three died, and seven remained hospitalized.The CDC and FDA lifted the pause, deciding that the vaccine’s benefits outweighed the rare risk of blood clots. They said the risk could be handled with warnings to help younger women decide if they should use that shot or an alternative. More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reportsKCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at newstips@kcra.com.Get the Facts on the Vax: Viewer questions answered about the COVID-19 vaccine for kids 5-11 Get the Facts on the Vax: Addressing fertility concerns with the COVID-19 vaccine Should kids about to turn 12 get the child’s vaccine dose? Kaiser doctor answers viewer questions Q&A: Doctor answers questions about COVID-19 vaccine safety for young children Are COVID-19 boosters the same as the original vaccines? Get the Facts on the Vax: Do you have to get multiple doses of the vaccine for it to be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: When will the J&J vaccine be available for children 12 and up?Get the Facts on the Vax: Will I be charged for a COVID-19 vaccine?Get the Facts on the Vax: Why should I get vaccinated if I already had COVID-19?Get the Facts on the Vax: For how long will the vaccines be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: Who should still be getting tested for COVID-19?Can COVID-19 vaccines affect my period?So you got the COVID-19 vaccine: 9 common questions answeredQ&A: Dr. Blumberg answers viewer questions about COVID-19 vaccine safetyYour guide to every COVID-19 vaccine questionYour COVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Facebook Live with Dr. Dean Blumberg, chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at UC Davis HealthCOVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Can I test positive after getting the shot? What if I’ve already had COVID? Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California? Demand for COVID-19 testing in California and across the country has surged as the highly infectious delta variant spreads and proof of a negative test is increasingly being required for travel, admission to entertainment events, job sites and schools.Testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.You can get a COVID-19 test from any provider at any time and should not pay anything, including a co-pay or payment toward a deductible for getting tested.Click here for what you should know about getting reimbursed if you were charged. Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here. | MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests| MORE | How to get reimbursed for an at-home COVID-19 test in California How to protect yourself of COVID-19Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.• Follow guidance from public health officials.What are the symptoms of COVID-19? Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or face Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.Who is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in California, community transmission, vaccine rates and booster shots and the latest headlines — all in one place.

App users, click here to see all the charts with this story.

Latest COVID-19 cases in California

Case Statistics

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).

Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in California

Hospitals

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state)

Community transmission in California

Below you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California.

Latest COVID-19 headlines

How many vaccines have been administered in California?

| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP code

Vaccine

Vaccine Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country?

Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.

You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.

Pharmacy vaccine information:
CVS

Rite Aid

Walgreens

Can my child be vaccinated against COVID-19?

In November, the CDC gave the final OK to approve Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11.

The kid-sized dose is one-third the size of the adult dose and is administered with a smaller needle. Similar to the adult dosage, eligible kids will need to have two shots that are 21 days apart.

Parents can book appointments for their child on MyTurn.ca.gov or call 833-422-4255.

| MORE | Click here for more information on pharmacies providing the COVID-19 vaccine for your child

You can also check your county’s health department for more information on upcoming vaccine clinics.

Will I need a booster shot?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Nov. 30 strengthened its recommendations for who should get a COVID-19 booster shot.

All adults should get a booster due to waning immunity, the CDC says.

People immunized with Pfizer/BioNTech’s or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines should get a booster six months after they finish their first two doses.

Anyone who got a Johnson & Johnson shot at least two months ago should also get a booster, the CDC said.

California officials previously made similar recommendations.

“The recent emergence of the Omicron variant (B.1.1.529) further emphasizes the importance of vaccination, boosters, and prevention efforts needed to protect against COVID-19,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said.

What should I know about the vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from the FDA?

Moderna and Pfizer vaccines

Hailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.

Those COVID-19 vaccines currently approved under emergency use authorization contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.

According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”

Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine

On Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. and is one that “checks nearly all the boxes.”

The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, was said to be safe and effective, and it’s considered flexible. It’s a single dose, and it doesn’t require special storage.

The vaccine is authorized for people ages 18 and older.

The CDC and the FDA on April 13 said they were investigating several cases of unusual clots that occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination. The clots occurred in veins that drain blood from the brain and occurred together with low platelets.

As a result, the agencies recommended a “pause” in vaccinations with J&J’s vaccine so investigators could look into the cases.

Health officials said in an update on April 23 they were aware of 15 cases of the unusual clots since the government authorized use of the vaccine and nearly 8 million shots were given. All were women, most of them under 50. Three died, and seven remained hospitalized.

The CDC and FDA lifted the pause, deciding that the vaccine’s benefits outweighed the rare risk of blood clots. They said the risk could be handled with warnings to help younger women decide if they should use that shot or an alternative.

More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reports

KCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at newstips@kcra.com.


Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California?

Demand for COVID-19 testing in California and across the country has surged as the highly infectious delta variant spreads and proof of a negative test is increasingly being required for travel, admission to entertainment events, job sites and schools.

Testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.

You can get a COVID-19 test from any provider at any time and should not pay anything, including a co-pay or payment toward a deductible for getting tested.

Click here for what you should know about getting reimbursed if you were charged.

Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here.

| MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests

| MORE | How to get reimbursed for an at-home COVID-19 test in California


How to protect yourself of COVID-19

Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:

• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

• Follow guidance from public health officials.


What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms.

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Source