/Storm to form off coast could bring high winds, heavy snow to New Hampshire for Saturday – WMUR Manchester

Storm to form off coast could bring high winds, heavy snow to New Hampshire for Saturday – WMUR Manchester


It will be quiet and chilly through most of Friday ahead of a likely nor’easter for Saturday.A few flurries will be possible on Friday ahead of the weekend storm.>> Early look at hour-by-hour timelineBased on the current expected track, which is subject to change a bit through Friday, snow is expected to fill in from the south and toward the north Saturday morning. Slippery travel is expected during this time.>> Weather alertsCurrent computer forecast models suggest the precipitation will fall as a fluffy snow and will pick up in intensity late Saturday morning and afternoon. Bands of heavy snow could set up in the eastern half of the state, especially south and east of the Lakes Region.>> Interactive Radar When snow is fluffy in nature, snow will accumulate more quickly and will be blown around by winds more easily resulting in drifts and poor visibility.According to the latest model guidance, it looks like 12-20 inches could fall in a line from Rochester to Nashua and points south and east, while much of the state likely sees 6-12 inches of accumulation. Lower amounts are likely north and west of the Lakes Region. See Hayley’s explanation about the initial snow projection here. Depending on the ultimate track of the storm, these amounts are likely to change over the next 24 hours, so stay tuned to important updates.Strong winds are likely especially from the Lakes Region south and east with highest gusts near the coast Saturday from late am into the evening, and there are concerns for minor to (possibly moderate) coastal flooding and beach erosion, especially during the high tide times at Hampton Beach, which are at 8:07 a.m. and 8:56 p.m. on Saturday and 9:08 a.m. on Sunday.The track of the storm is incredibly important. Any shift toward the coast or farther away from the coast would have a big impact on wind intensity and snowfall amounts. A track change of just 40-50 miles would mean more snow for many, or lower totals. The storm won’t start to form until Friday, so there is still some time to watch the trends in computer model guidance.>> See an early look at the hour-by-hour timeline:Stay tuned to the Storm Watch 9 team for the latest forecasts this week. Be weather aware! Download the WMUR app for Apple or Android devices and turn on push notifications. You can choose to receive weather alerts for your geolocation and/or up to three ZIP codes. In addition, you can receive word when precipitation is coming to your area.

It will be quiet and chilly through most of Friday ahead of a likely nor’easter for Saturday.

Snow forecast for 1-29-22 as of 1-27-22

A few flurries will be possible on Friday ahead of the weekend storm.

>> Early look at hour-by-hour timeline

Based on the current expected track, which is subject to change a bit through Friday, snow is expected to fill in from the south and toward the north Saturday morning. Slippery travel is expected during this time.

>> Weather alerts

Current computer forecast models suggest the precipitation will fall as a fluffy snow and will pick up in intensity late Saturday morning and afternoon. Bands of heavy snow could set up in the eastern half of the state, especially south and east of the Lakes Region.

>> Interactive Radar

When snow is fluffy in nature, snow will accumulate more quickly and will be blown around by winds more easily resulting in drifts and poor visibility.

According to the latest model guidance, it looks like 12-20 inches could fall in a line from Rochester to Nashua and points south and east, while much of the state likely sees 6-12 inches of accumulation. Lower amounts are likely north and west of the Lakes Region. See Hayley’s explanation about the initial snow projection here. Depending on the ultimate track of the storm, these amounts are likely to change over the next 24 hours, so stay tuned to important updates.

Strong winds are likely especially from the Lakes Region south and east with highest gusts near the coast Saturday from late am into the evening, and there are concerns for minor to (possibly moderate) coastal flooding and beach erosion, especially during the high tide times at Hampton Beach, which are at 8:07 a.m. and 8:56 p.m. on Saturday and 9:08 a.m. on Sunday.

The track of the storm is incredibly important. Any shift toward the coast or farther away from the coast would have a big impact on wind intensity and snowfall amounts. A track change of just 40-50 miles would mean more snow for many, or lower totals. The storm won’t start to form until Friday, so there is still some time to watch the trends in computer model guidance.

>> See an early look at the hour-by-hour timeline:

Stay tuned to the Storm Watch 9 team for the latest forecasts this week.

Be weather aware! Download the WMUR app for Apple or Android devices and turn on push notifications. You can choose to receive weather alerts for your geolocation and/or up to three ZIP codes. In addition, you can receive word when precipitation is coming to your area.

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