/Kreider Farms in Donegal, Lancaster County, destroys 1.5 million chickens to prevent spread of avian flu – WGAL Susquehanna Valley Pa.

Kreider Farms in Donegal, Lancaster County, destroys 1.5 million chickens to prevent spread of avian flu – WGAL Susquehanna Valley Pa.


No new cases of avian flu have been reported two days after a Lancaster County poultry farm destroyed nearly 1.5 million chickens to stop the spread.The Kreider Farms Donegal egg-laying facility remains under quarantine, along with farms in about a six-mile radius. Those farms are testing for bird flu.Poultry is a $7 billion industry in Pennsylvania. The spread of avian flu could impact what you buy.”If you start pulling birds out, production out, meat, eggs, clearly all of that – there are only so many chickens, only so many eggs. only so many chickens, eggs, poultry, so we have to be aware that there could be implications to supply if we do not contain this,” said Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding.If you suspect live poultry is infected, you are asked to report it to the Pennsylvania Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852. That number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Symptoms of avian flu in poultry include a lack of energy and appetite.First bird flu case in nearly 40 yearsThe Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is on high alert for the avian flu after the first case in nearly four decades was found in Lancaster County over the weekend.The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture confirmed the state’s first positive case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in domestic poultry in a flock of commercial layer chickens on a poultry farm in East Donegal Township. The 1.5 million chickens at the Kreider Farms location have been destroyed.That farm and 103 commercial poultry facilities in a 10-kilometer radius are quarantined.The farms are also adding extra biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of the avian flu and to ensure eggs and other poultry products being produced there are safe. “Protecting Pennsylvania’s $7.1 billion poultry industry is a year-round top priority,” said Redding. “We have strict biosecurity protocols in place both for Pennsylvania farms and for poultry products shipped in and out of the state. We have had $2 million budgeted and set aside since 2016 to respond to avian influenza, in addition to equipment, supplies, laboratories and highly trained experts who have been on high alert and are supporting our poultry farmers.”There is no immediate public health concern for Pennsylvanians, and we are prepared to respond to this agricultural issue. However, wild birds carry the virus and do not respect property or state lines,” he added. “Anyone visiting a farm should be aware that your vehicles and shoes may carry the virus from other places you have walked. Clean them thoroughly and stay away from poultry barns unless you have to be there. Please be vigilant and do your part to protect our farms.” Kreider Farms statementTom Beachler, vice president of operations at Kreider Farms, released the following statement: “Kreider Farms, along with state and USDA officials, has been working round the clock to reduce the risk of further spread of the Avian Influenza. The loss of birds at this site represents 15% of our egg layers. Fortunately, we are still able to fill customer egg orders from our other remaining locations which have all tested negative for the virus. While our site situation is under control we are aware that this year’s Avian Influenza is very transmittable in wild birds and still represents a very large threat to the nation’s commercial egg, broiler, and turkey flocks.” Avian flu riskThere is no risk to the public, and poultry and eggs are safe to eat if cooked properly.But HPAI is highly infectious ​and can be fatal to domestic birds (chickens, ducks, geese, quail, pheasants, guinea fowl and turkeys).According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, avian influenza detections do not present an immediate public health concern. No human cases of avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States.The positive samples were taken from a flock in East Donegal Township, Lancaster County, and tested at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory. The finding was confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. An interagency HPAI task force works regularly to address the threat of disease to Pennsylvania’s wild and domestic bird populations. The task force includes:Pennsylvania Emergency Management AgencyPennsylvania Department of AgriculturePennsylvania Department HealthGeneral Services and Environmental ProtectionPennsylvania State PolicePennsylvania Game CommissionAir National GuardU.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) Veterinary Services Wildlife ServicesThe task force will carry out the response plan, which includes education and public outreach, and minimizing risk factors through strict biosecurity measures and continued surveillance, testing and management. This is the first confirmed case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Pennsylvania in commercial poultry since an outbreak in 1983 to 1984. As of April 15, 2022, infected birds in commercial and backyard poultry flocks had been confirmed in 27 states including most states surrounding Pennsylvania.

No new cases of avian flu have been reported two days after a Lancaster County poultry farm destroyed nearly 1.5 million chickens to stop the spread.

The Kreider Farms Donegal egg-laying facility remains under quarantine, along with farms in about a six-mile radius. Those farms are testing for bird flu.

Poultry is a $7 billion industry in Pennsylvania. The spread of avian flu could impact what you buy.

“If you start pulling birds out, production out, meat, eggs, clearly all of that – there are only so many chickens, only so many eggs. only so many chickens, eggs, poultry, so we have to be aware that there could be implications to supply if we do not contain this,” said Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding.

If you suspect live poultry is infected, you are asked to report it to the Pennsylvania Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852. That number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Symptoms of avian flu in poultry include a lack of energy and appetite.

First bird flu case in nearly 40 years

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is on high alert for the avian flu after the first case in nearly four decades was found in Lancaster County over the weekend.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture confirmed the state’s first positive case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in domestic poultry in a flock of commercial layer chickens on a poultry farm in East Donegal Township.

The 1.5 million chickens at the Kreider Farms location have been destroyed.

That farm and 103 commercial poultry facilities in a 10-kilometer radius are quarantined.

The farms are also adding extra biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of the avian flu and to ensure eggs and other poultry products being produced there are safe.

“Protecting Pennsylvania’s $7.1 billion poultry industry is a year-round top priority,” said Redding. “We have strict biosecurity protocols in place both for Pennsylvania farms and for poultry products shipped in and out of the state. We have had $2 million budgeted and set aside since 2016 to respond to avian influenza, in addition to equipment, supplies, laboratories and highly trained experts who have been on high alert and are supporting our poultry farmers.

“There is no immediate public health concern for Pennsylvanians, and we are prepared to respond to this agricultural issue. However, wild birds carry the virus and do not respect property or state lines,” he added. “Anyone visiting a farm should be aware that your vehicles and shoes may carry the virus from other places you have walked. Clean them thoroughly and stay away from poultry barns unless you have to be there. Please be vigilant and do your part to protect our farms.”

Kreider Farms statement

Tom Beachler, vice president of operations at Kreider Farms, released the following statement:

“Kreider Farms, along with state and USDA officials, has been working round the clock to reduce the risk of further spread of the Avian Influenza. The loss of birds at this site represents 15% of our egg layers. Fortunately, we are still able to fill customer egg orders from our other remaining locations which have all tested negative for the virus. While our site situation is under control we are aware that this year’s Avian Influenza is very transmittable in wild birds and still represents a very large threat to the nation’s commercial egg, broiler, and turkey flocks.”


Avian flu risk

There is no risk to the public, and poultry and eggs are safe to eat if cooked properly.

But HPAI is highly infectious ​and can be fatal to domestic birds (chickens, ducks, geese, quail, pheasants, guinea fowl and turkeys).

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, avian influenza detections do not present an immediate public health concern.

No human cases of avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States.

The positive samples were taken from a flock in East Donegal Township, Lancaster County, and tested at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory. The finding was confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

An interagency HPAI task force works regularly to address the threat of disease to Pennsylvania’s wild and domestic bird populations. The task force includes:

  • Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency
  • Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture
  • Pennsylvania Department Health
  • General Services and Environmental Protection
  • Pennsylvania State Police
  • Pennsylvania Game Commission
  • Air National Guard
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) Veterinary Services
  • Wildlife Services

The task force will carry out the response plan, which includes education and public outreach, and minimizing risk factors through strict biosecurity measures and continued surveillance, testing and management.

This is the first confirmed case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Pennsylvania in commercial poultry since an outbreak in 1983 to 1984.

As of April 15, 2022, infected birds in commercial and backyard poultry flocks had been confirmed in 27 states including most states surrounding Pennsylvania.

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